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onsdag 31 maj 2017

Unseen film footage appears to represent the core of the Flynn Intel Group’s $530,000 work on behalf of Turkey , against kurds ,SDF & fethullah Gulen

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Unseen film footage appears to represent the core of the Flynn Intel Group’s $530,000 work on behalf of Turkey , against kurds ,SDF & fethullah Gulen
full report by The Wall Street Journal. link: https://www.wsj.com/…/mike-flynns-pro-turkey-work-an-unfini…


Mike Flynn’s Pro-Turkey Work: An Unfinished Documentary to Boost Country’s Image
Unseen film footage appears to represent the core of the Flynn Intel Group’s $530,000 work on behalf of Turkey
The moment that Erdogan paid $530,000 to former U.S national security advisor Mike Flynn, to work on behalf of Turkey, against Kurds and gulen movement, full report by The Wall Street Journal
Link: https://www.wsj.com/…/mike-flynns-pro-turkey-work-an-unfini…
Mike Flynn’s Pro-Turkey Work: An Unfinished Documentary to Boost Country’s Image
Unseen film footage appears to represent the core of the Flynn Intel Group’s $530,000 work on behalf of Turkey
WASHINGTON—Last fall, as retired Lt. Gen. Mike Flynn traveled the country stumping for Donald Trump, his business partner holed up in a small Washington hotel room with the former head of Turkish military intelligence to work on a special project.
“General, hi. I’m Bijan Kian, welcome to Washington, D.C.,” Mr. Kian, the head of Mr. Flynn’s consulting firm, greeted the Turkish dignitary. “Gen. Flynn, my partner, sends his regards to you.”
The hotel room meeting was filmed as part of a documentary the Flynn Intel Group was producing for a Turkish businessman, who paid $530,000 to the lobbying shop to polish the country’s image after a botched military coup. That contract has landed Mr. Flynn in legal jeopardy.
The unfinished, never-distributed film, details of which haven’t been previously reported, appears to represent the core of the Flynn Intel Group’s work for Turkish interests.
The contract is at the heart of an expanding investigation into Mr. Flynn’s business dealings. In February the retired three-star general was forced to resign, under fire over his conflicting statements about his contacts with Russian officials before the inauguration, after 24 days as Mr. Trump’s national security adviser.
Mr. Flynn didn’t disclose to the federal government until March that his company was paid to represent Turkish interests. He is now facing military, congressional and criminal investigations into allegations that he improperly concealed his financial ties to Turkey and Russia, and into whether the ties played any role in his decisions as the president’s adviser.
Along with the money from the Turkish businessman, Mr. Flynn received $33,750 from a Russian state news network to travel to Moscow in 2015, sit next to President Vladimir Putin at a gala and give a public interview on U.S. foreign policy.
A federal grand jury in Virginia recently issued subpoenas to people who worked for the Flynn Intel Group. Last week, Mr. Flynn said he would invoke his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination and refuse to honor a subpoena from the Senate Intelligence Committee, which is investigating allegations of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.
On Tuesday, Mr. Flynn said he would turn over documents from his businesses to the Senate Intelligence Committee, according to a person familiar with the matter. The Flynn Intel Group shut down in November.
Robert Kelner, the attorney for Mr. Flynn and the Flynn Intel Group declined to comment. In the past, Mr. Kelner has criticized what he called “unfounded allegations” against Mr. Flynn and said he hoped Mr. Flynn would have a fair chance to tell his story. Mr. Kian didn’t respond to requests for comment.
Flynn Intel Group hired professionals to shoot the documentary and then worked to conceal its role in producing the film, according to David Enders, a former VICE News correspondent hired to work on the project. The Wall Street Journal reviewed footage prepared for the unfinished documentary, which was shelved last November, two days before Mr. Flynn was officially asked to become the president’s national security adviser.
Mr. Enders and Rudi Bakhtiar, a former CNN anchor hired to be the on-camera face for the film, said the disclosure in March about Mr. Flynn’s work as a foreign agent came as a shock.
Ms. Bakhtiar said she was misled about the true intentions of the film, which she said was focused on attacking a U.S.-based Turkish imam President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has accused of orchestrating last summer’s botched military coup. She said she thought the work would produce an objective, investigatory documentary about Turkey and Fethullah Gulen, the imam.
As the documentary plans moved ahead last fall, Mr. Enders said that Mr. Kian told him he didn’t want anyone to know who was behind the film about Mr. Gulen, whom Mr. Erdogan wants the U.S. to extradite to Turkey to face accusations he runs a terrorist group behind last summer’s failed coup.
“Bijan said they did not want to be connected to this in any way,” Mr. Enders said. “He said: ‘We don’t want anyone to know the Flynn Intel Group has anything to do with this.’ ” Mr. Enders said Mr. Kian didn’t explain his reasons.
The project began last summer, after Mr. Erdogan quashed a poorly conceived July 15 military coup attempt. A few weeks later, Ekim Alptekin, a Turkish businessman and Erdogan defender, signed a three-month contract with the Flynn Intel Group to help Turkish interests.

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